Super Plant: tastes smoky, like bacon

Tastes like bacon, must be bacon, right?  If it’s bacon yes, but what about if it’s a plant?  Let’s call it a super plant.  Please be introduced to Dulse, a beautiful dark red, flowy plant that lives in tIMG_1066he northern coastal waters of the Pacific and the Atlantic.  And yes, when cooked (roasted), it tastes smoky, a bit like bacon and not fishy.

What makes it super?  It is very high in:  digestive protein, iron, B vitamins, Vitamin. C, iodine, potassium and sodium to name a few.   It has been widely used as food by the maritime Irish and Scots.  It supports your body by strengthening you blood, adrenals and kidneys.  It’s excellent for hormonal support as well as for the lymphatic system and immune system.  It doesn’t stop there, Dulse, as other edible sea plants support the nervous and urinary system.  The fact that it is rich in manganese gives the benefit of activating enzymes, so overall digestion is supported which in turns supports almost every function in the body.

If you like the big words then here is an arsenal for Dulse:  anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anticoagulant, antithrombotic, antiviral and antioxidant.  In other words, it protects your body against harmful inflammation, against cancer, viruses and keeps your blood from clotting.  It has powerful phyto (plant) nutrients that protect your heart and other vital organs.  Some studies have shown (although inconclusively) that the mineral vanadium, present in sea vegetables, may be able to increase our cells’ sensitive to insulin.  Thus, help us prevent over production of glucose by our cells, and help take existing blood sugars and convert them into storable starches.

Dulse can be purchased at your local health food store as packaged fronds and also as dried flakes or powder.  Be sure to use only organic, sustainable sources.
Dulse makes an excellent seasoning in home prepared foods.  It brings a salty taste as well as the smoky bacon flavor.  Rebecca Wood suggests that Dulse be tossed with salted nuts and served with a good microbeer.  She goes on to ask, “Guess which disappears first?”   I believe this is an experiment worth trying.

George Mateljan suggests adding it as a topping on salads, mixed in rice dishes, or added to soups, legumes or vegetable dishes for flavor and nutrition.  It’s especially great on potatoes and corn dishes.  Kids and finicky eaters will enjoy it without them knowing.  Dulse is readily available at organic grocery stores and many health food stores.

Julia R. Parsell

Maybe I especially like dulse because I identify with her.  She’s tenacious, hardly, adaptable, and flourishes even in extreme situations.  And she has a wise woman way of changing her form to adapt to specific micro-environments.  Dulse is a wise woman, a shape-shifter, a bleeding woman, a changing woman, a woman whose friend it is good to be.   – Susun S. Weed,  Healing Wise

www.worldshealthiestfoods.com
Weed, S. Healing Wise. Ash Tree Publishing, 1989

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